And in other news ...

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honestbroker1
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And in other news ...

Post by honestbroker1 » Fri Mar 12, 2021 3:19 pm

The Telegraph thinks US President Joe Bidden might have dementia:
Joe Biden’s decline has become so painful to see and so embarrassing to watch that it feels cruel to mention it. But it’s even more cruel that Biden’s team act as if it’s not happening, and most of America’s media look the other way.

On Thursday night, Biden marked the first anniversary of the Covid-19 shutdowns and his fiftieth day in the White House by giving the first televised address of his presidency. He hadn’t been seen in public for three days, which is what he seems to require if he’s not to unravel before the cameras.

From the moment he wheezed up to the lectern and peered into the camera, you could tell Biden was on top form: croaky sentiment, sporadic belligerence, and only the occasional moment when he looked oddly distant and perplexed, as though he didn’t understand the words he was reading.

He got through twenty minutes, then tottered off without taking any questions or falling over his dog. This is how low the bar now is for Biden. And we can see how hard Biden has to fight, and what a long run-up he requires, if he is to clear it.

We can see it in his struggle to follow the simple lines on his autocue, and in his bungling of the simplest ad-libs. We see it in the clips of his increasingly desperate handlers trying to block him from questions at his rare and carefully managed appearances before the cameras. Most of all, we see it in his eyes.

Biden frequently looks afraid and lost. Anyone who has spent time with elderly people in the early stages of dementia knows that expression – and the sporadic and worsening loss of focus that causes it.

“What am I doing here?” Biden asked after fumbling his autocue lines in an address in Texas in late February. He reached for the cue cards that are now his constant companion. “I’m gonna lose track here.”

Biden’s supporters call him “gaffe-prone”. It’s true: he’s always thought with his mouth open. It’s also true that he bravely overcame a speech impediment in childhood, and that anxiety and age can cause a stutter to recur. But these aren’t gaffes or stutters.

Compare how he moves and sounds now to how he was a year ago, let alone five years ago. Biden looks and sounds frail. He seems visibly distressed at his inability to carry out the simplest requirements of office – and at a time when the requirements are simpler than usual.

When Biden dodged the press during last year’s election campaign, his aides called it Covid-19 precautions. As the pandemic ends, he will run out of excuses for not travelling. He doesn’t look capable of leading an international summit, let alone taking the proverbial 3 a.m. phone call.

Earlier this week, the Commander-in-Chief forgot the name of the largest department in the US government, the Department of Defense, as well as the name of the man he recently appointed as its leader, Lloyd Austin.

“Thank you to the Sec… the former general… I keep calling him general… my… my… the guy who runs that outfit over there,” he flailed.

Biden is the first President in decades to reach fifty days in office without giving a press conference. He missed giving the traditional speech to Congress in February. His handlers refuse to name when he might talk to the press, and only offer that it’s “something he will do in the future”.

There’s only one possible explanation. Biden’s team don’t trust him to manage one of the simplest requirements of modern political office. But they know they can’t defer the reckoning.

The longer Biden waits, the more newsworthy his delayed appearance will be, and the greater the scrutiny of his performance. And once Biden has surrendered to the rising expectation that he speak live and unscripted, he will be expected to do it again, and again, just like any other President.

This presidency is turning into a theatre of cruelty. It can only end one way. Sooner or later, Biden will be caught in the spotlight. The Democrats who promoted an unfit candidate to America’s highest office, and the media who covered for him, will be exposed as having betrayed their responsibilities to the American people. The people’s trust in democratic institutions will decline further. And we will all be party to Biden’s public humiliation.
Dominic Green is deputy editor of The Spectator’s US edition.

:s_sad

But it’s even more cruel that Biden’s team act as if it’s not happening, and most of America’s media look the other way.

I have a subscription to the Washington Post.

No mention of it there.

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Alibongo
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Re: And in other news ...

Post by Alibongo » Fri Mar 12, 2021 3:59 pm

He's declined pretty fast given the amazing speech at his inauguration :rolleyes:
It's BS the fact is he's accomplished more in his short time in office than Trump in four years imo.
It sticks in the GOP craws :s_yes
He's no spring chicken but he's not on his last legs yet that said I don't think he'll complete his term in office either.
Parent-blaming is all-too-common these days, and usually the point is to make other parents feel better about their own parenting skills

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honestbroker1
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Re: And in other news ...

Post by honestbroker1 » Fri Mar 12, 2021 11:12 pm

The Washington Post has commented on Biden's lack of public appearances, but without speculating as to why.

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Re: And in other news ...

Post by honestbroker1 » Sat Mar 13, 2021 12:30 pm

Washington Post
After 50 days as president, Biden still hasn’t given a news conference. Critics and allies wonder why.
More to follow ....

Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton both did their first one after just nine days in office.
Barack Obama waited 20 days.

And Donald Trump had been president for only a week before giving his first news conference, where he fielded questions alongside then-British Prime Minister Theresa May.

But Joe Biden still hasn’t had a formal news conference since his inauguration on Jan. 20. Thursday was his 50th full day in office.

The seven-week stretch is the longest a new president has gone without meeting the press in the past 100 years, dating back to when Calvin Coolidge, a man known as “Silent Cal,” was president, according to research by the American Presidency Project at the University of California at Santa Barbara.

Biden delivered his first prime-time address to the nation Thursday night — but it appears the nation will wait longer to see him respond to questions at his first presidential news conference. He has often taken a question or two from reporters at the end of speeches or statements, as he did Wednesday after remarks about an increase in the coronavirus vaccine supply. But his record as president so far mirrors his behavior as a candidate, when Biden gave several interviews but rarely interacted with a roomful of reporters.

His reluctance to do so since becoming president has attracted comment and criticism from allies and foes alike.

Kayleigh McEnany suggested last week that Biden is ducking the media to avoid gaffes, and that his staff is “protecting” him from the sort of unscripted exchanges he would face in a news conference. Former Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows made similar comments to Fox News host S*** Hannity on Tuesday, and Hannity alleged that the White House is continuing to “hide” Biden.

The Washington Post’s editorial board, which endorsed Biden’s candidacy, on Sunday urged Biden to get on with it, too: “Americans have every right to expect that [the president] will regularly submit himself to substantial questioning.”

White House correspondents are, of course, eager to fire questions at the new president. “Reporters like press conferences and will always demand them, but they aren’t just for our benefit,” said Jonathan Karl, ABC News’s White House reporter. “Above all, press conferences are for the public’s benefit. People have a right to see their president regularly answering questions.”

White House and press are at odds over plan to charge reporters for coronavirus testing

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said last week that Biden will hold his first news conference “before the end of the month,” though she didn’t specify a date. She said Biden’s “time, energy and focus” have been elsewhere — specifically, on the coronavirus pandemic, the economy and the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill passed by Congress this week.
At this point in office, Trump had given five news conferences. Obama had given two, George W. Bush three and Clinton five.

However, those figures require an asterisk. Four of the five news conferences Trump gave during this period were the bilateral kind, in which the president and a foreign leader appear jointly and take turns calling on reporters. He went solo in only one of the five. Obama, Bush and Clinton also appeared alone just once during their first 50 days.

The pandemic has limited Biden’s ability to meet with foreign leaders or to travel abroad, Gerhard Peters, the Presidency Project’s co-director, pointed out. Thus, “it is not at all surprising to me that the frequency of [news conferences] is much lower than presidents in recent years. Essentially, there is little opportunity.”
Still, there’s been plenty of news on the home front — which many reporters argue is ample reason for holding a news conference. Presidential news conferences, which have been televised since Eisenhower was in office, enable the commander in chief to explain his approach to issues and crises under independent questioning. “Press conferences are critical to informing the American people and holding an administration accountable to the public,” said Zeke Miller, the president of the White House Correspondents’ Association, which has called on Biden to hold regular news conferences.

Yet all modern presidents develop communications strategies that play to their strengths and comfort levels, and sometimes these do not prioritize news conferences, said John Woolley, the Presidency Project’s other co-director.

“I can imagine [Biden] doesn’t see a big benefit in press conferences,” Woolley said, especially since he has recently succeeded with the passage of the coronavirus relief bill. Meanwhile, there could be little to be gained by “taking questions on every conceivable topic from a very heterogeneous media crowd.”

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honestbroker1
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Re: And in other news ...

Post by honestbroker1 » Sat Mar 13, 2021 7:55 pm

This paints a much more encouraging picture:

https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/new ... ens-health

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honestbroker1
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Re: And in other news ...

Post by honestbroker1 » Tue Mar 16, 2021 3:45 pm


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