Cricket is a dangerous game

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honestbroker1
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Re: Cricket is a dangerous game

Post by honestbroker1 » Sat Nov 29, 2014 11:07 am

This is quite a good write-up on the infamous 'bodyline' series I referred to earlier:

Bodyline




Australian Captain, Bill Woodfull, clutches his chest after being hit by a short-pitched delivery, 3rd Test Adelaide, 1932-33.

The term ‘Bodyline’ was first used by the Australian sports journalist Ray Robinson during the England cricket tour to Australia in 1932-33.
Essentially, it was a tactic used by fast bowlers to take wickets by intimidating batsmen with the ball. Quick bowlers, and they had to be very swift for the tactic to work, would bowl short, rising deliveries aimed at the batsman’s body. The batsman would be forced to fend the ball off defensively to a packed, close, leg-side field who would snap up the catches commonly offered.

Don Bradman’s phenomenal success in the 1930 Ashes series sewed the seeds for Bodyline. England were widely expected to easily beat Australia but Bradman’s Test scores of 131, 254, 334 & 232 saw Australia win the series 2-1. Bradman’s series Test average was 98.66. The 1932-33 England Captain Douglas Jardine claimed that he saw Bradman flinch once or twice at short deliveries during the 1930 series. He instructed his two opening bowlers Harold Larwood and Bill Voce (both from Nottinghamshire) to bowl what he called ‘leg-theory’ (later Bodyline). Larwood, though small in stature, was a phenomenal athlete and had the ability to bowl very quickly and get the ball to lift. Voce was similarly quick and a left-hander which made him difficult to play off the body.

During the 1932-33 series this bowling partnership, under instruction from Jardine, bowled Bodyline at regular intervals in games. It was not a popular decision with Australian crowds who loudly heckled the Englishmen. Australian batsmen, especially the openers, Jack Fingleton and Bill Ponsford together with Victor Richardson were struck many painful blows much to the crowds’ displeasure. Bradman was only hit once in the series, on the upper arm, but spent much of his time avoiding the ball at the expense of making runs. The tactic was working.

Feelings came to crisis point during the Third Test in Adelaide in January 1933. Australian Captain Bill Woodfull was struck a painful blow by Larwood over the heart. His wicket-keeper, Bert Oldfield, was hit in the head also by Larwood fracturing his skull. The angry crowd threatened to invade the pitch and mounted police were poised to quell any violence.

At the end of the day’s play the England Manager Sir Pelham ‘Plum’ Warner visited the Australian dressing room to commiserate with the injured. The Australian Captain Bill Woodfull is reputed to have received him icily with the words; ‘I don’t want to see you Mr Warner. There are two teams out there. One is trying to play cricket, the other is not.’





Australian wicket-keeper 'Bert' Oldfield reels from being struck in the head by a delivery from Harold Larwood, 3rd Test, Adelaide, 1932-33. Oldfield took no further part in the game suffering from a fractured skull. The depth of ill-feeling between the two teams led the Australian Cricket Board of Control to write by cable to its England counterpart, the Marylebone Cricket Club on 18 January, 1933;
Bodyline bowling has assumed such proportions as to menace the best interests of the game, making protection of the body by batsmen the main consideration. Causing intensely bitter feeling between players as well as injury. In our opinion it is unsportsmanlike. Unless stopped at once likely to upset friendly relations existing between Australia and England.

The MCC took offense and a series of bitter exchanges ensued, at one point involving both countries governments.

In the end, England won the series and blunted Bradman to a Test series average of 56.57 runs per innings. There was never a formal acknowledgement from the England authorities that Bodyline bowling was un-sportsmanlike but subsequent actions indicated a recognised culpability. Douglas Jardine would never again captain England against Australia while Harold Larwood never played Test cricket again, despite topping the England 1st class bowling averages in 1937. Another legacy of the tactic was a change in the cricket rules. Bodyline was banned and a law was introduced to prevent no more than two fieldsmen gathering between square-leg and the wicket-keeper.

Consequently, the 1934 Australian tour to England featured no Bodyline bowling and relations between the two teams quickly healed.


http://www.bradmantrail.com.au/story_11.php

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Carana
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Re: Cricket is a dangerous game

Post by Carana » Sat Nov 29, 2014 11:51 am

I'll bow to your superior knowledge, HB. :s_yes

The closest I've ever been to understanding what cricket was about was an explanation printed on a teatowel.

"You have two sides, one out in the field and one in. Each man that's in the side that's in goes out, and when he's out he comes in and the next man goes in until he's out. When they are all out, the side that's out comes in and the side thats been in goes out and tries to get those coming in, out. Sometimes you get men still in and not out.

When a man goes out to go in, the men who are out try to get him out, and when he is out he goes in and the next man in goes out and goes in. There are two men called umpires who stay all out all the time and they decide when the men who are in are out.

When both sides have been in and all the men have out, and both sides have been out twice after all the men have been in, including those who are not out, that is the end of the game!"
"A professor of mine used to say 'I have as a pet a coprophagic beetle, who eats only dung. His antennae quiver when he detects the presence of his food.'" - Edison, English-language Wikipedia Admin

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Winter
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Re: Cricket is a dangerous game

Post by Winter » Sat Nov 29, 2014 12:41 pm

Carana wrote:I'll bow to your superior knowledge, HB. :s_yes

The closest I've ever been to understanding what cricket was about was an explanation printed on a teatowel.

"You have two sides, one out in the field and one in. Each man that's in the side that's in goes out, and when he's out he comes in and the next man goes in until he's out. When they are all out, the side that's out comes in and the side thats been in goes out and tries to get those coming in, out. Sometimes you get men still in and not out.

When a man goes out to go in, the men who are out try to get him out, and when he is out he goes in and the next man in goes out and goes in. There are two men called umpires who stay all out all the time and they decide when the men who are in are out.

When both sides have been in and all the men have out, and both sides have been out twice after all the men have been in, including those who are not out, that is the end of the game!"
LOL always wondered why I never understood it!
"there is a big difference between a few sordid insults, and publicly accusing someone of committing a serious crime - which is a crime in itself" AnnaEsse (Oh the irony!)

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honestbroker1
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Re: Cricket is a dangerous game

Post by honestbroker1 » Sat Nov 29, 2014 1:13 pm

Hmmmmm!

I understood cricket once.

I'm not so sure now ...

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honestbroker1
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Re: Cricket is a dangerous game

Post by honestbroker1 » Sat Nov 29, 2014 6:48 pm

Messrs Thomson and Lilly in action, putting England to the sword in the era before helmets ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nTaVRuxje80

bluj1515
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Re: Cricket is a dangerous game

Post by bluj1515 » Sat Nov 29, 2014 8:29 pm

This hit the news, here, too. Terribly sad. It is always horrible when something like this happens to someone playing what is ultimately a game.
The best thing to happen to a criminal is to have Pat Brown profile the crime; you'll never get caught!

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Re: Cricket is a dangerous game

Post by Chinagirl » Sat Nov 29, 2014 9:10 pm

Amazed that this tragic event even made the news in the States, Blu.

The funeral is on Wednesday, and the first test against India, due to start on Thursday, has been postponed with no new date given yet. I wonder if it would be abandoned altogether so that we have only three test matches instead of four???

Inevitably, there has been much discussion about the tactic of short-pitched bowling. To my mind, it's impossible to imagine the game should it be banned altogether. However, I can easily imagine the collective in-drawn breaths around the country - if not the world - the first time this summer when Mitchell Johnson, say, bowls one to an Indian batsman ..... And what of an Indian bowler sending one down to, say, Michael Clarke .......

Unspeakably tragic though this event has been, it needs to be put in perspective. It was an accident - an extremely rare, absolutely freakish, ACCIDENT. No blame can or should be attached to the bowler, the type of delivery, the inadequacy of the helmet to protect the neck area, or indeed any aspect of the wonderful game of cricket. ANY competitive sport has an element of risk. Take that away and it would become unappealing to competitors and audience alike. However, no normal person goes to watch a cricket match in the anticipation of seeing someone be killed, nor does any bowler deliberately set out to severely injure a batsman - intimidate, yes - but nothing more.

Nevertheless, I find it so hard to come to terms with the fact that we actually saw that young man die on the pitch. He was effectively dead when he fell face-forward, unconscious, onto the pitch. Medical intervention kept him breathing and technically alive on the ground and for 48 hours in hospital, but the injury was catastrophic - no chance of full recovery.

I'm an old woman who didn't know Phillip Hughes, nor have I ever played competitive cricket, yet like thousands - if not millions - I have been incredibly moved and saddened by this tragedy. It must be so much worse for his family, and his team-mates, especially those on the pitch that day who rushed in to help him. Of course, it would be impossible for them to play a five day test match starting this Thursday.

Today would have been his 26th birthday ..... dear God, his poor parents .....
:s_cry
[T]hose children were left alone and because of that fact one of them disappeared. (Fatima de Oliveira Esteves)

Wrong.
It's because someone took her.

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Truthiness2
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Re: Cricket is a dangerous game

Post by Truthiness2 » Sat Nov 29, 2014 10:04 pm

Chinagirl wrote:Amazed that this tragic event even made the news in the States, Blu.

The funeral is on Wednesday, and the first test against India, due to start on Thursday, has been postponed with no new date given yet. I wonder if it would be abandoned altogether so that we have only three test matches instead of four???

Inevitably, there has been much discussion about the tactic of short-pitched bowling. To my mind, it's impossible to imagine the game should it be banned altogether. However, I can easily imagine the collective in-drawn breaths around the country - if not the world - the first time this summer when Mitchell Johnson, say, bowls one to an Indian batsman ..... And what of an Indian bowler sending one down to, say, Michael Clarke .......

Unspeakably tragic though this event has been, it needs to be put in perspective. It was an accident - an extremely rare, absolutely freakish, ACCIDENT. No blame can or should be attached to the bowler, the type of delivery, the inadequacy of the helmet to protect the neck area, or indeed any aspect of the wonderful game of cricket. ANY competitive sport has an element of risk. Take that away and it would become unappealing to competitors and audience alike. However, no normal person goes to watch a cricket match in the anticipation of seeing someone be killed, nor does any bowler deliberately set out to severely injure a batsman - intimidate, yes - but nothing more.

Nevertheless, I find it so hard to come to terms with the fact that we actually saw that young man die on the pitch. He was effectively dead when he fell face-forward, unconscious, onto the pitch. Medical intervention kept him breathing and technically alive on the ground and for 48 hours in hospital, but the injury was catastrophic - no chance of full recovery.

I'm an old woman who didn't know Phillip Hughes, nor have I ever played competitive cricket, yet like thousands - if not millions -
I have been incredibly moved and saddened by this tragedy. It must be so much worse for his family, and his team-mates, especially those on the pitch that day who rushed in to help him. Of course, it would be impossible for them to play a five day test match starting this Thursday.

Today would have been his 26th birthday ..... dear God, his poor parents .....
:s_cry
:s_cry :s_cry :s_cry
“‎"Consider the rights of others before your own feelings, and the feelings of others before your own rights.”
― John Wooden

bluj1515
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Re: Cricket is a dangerous game

Post by bluj1515 » Sun Nov 30, 2014 1:43 am

Chinagirl wrote:Amazed that this tragic event even made the news in the States, Blu.

The funeral is on Wednesday, and the first test against India, due to start on Thursday, has been postponed with no new date given yet. I wonder if it would be abandoned altogether so that we have only three test matches instead of four???

Inevitably, there has been much discussion about the tactic of short-pitched bowling. To my mind, it's impossible to imagine the game should it be banned altogether. However, I can easily imagine the collective in-drawn breaths around the country - if not the world - the first time this summer when Mitchell Johnson, say, bowls one to an Indian batsman ..... And what of an Indian bowler sending one down to, say, Michael Clarke .......

Unspeakably tragic though this event has been, it needs to be put in perspective. It was an accident - an extremely rare, absolutely freakish, ACCIDENT. No blame can or should be attached to the bowler, the type of delivery, the inadequacy of the helmet to protect the neck area, or indeed any aspect of the wonderful game of cricket. ANY competitive sport has an element of risk. Take that away and it would become unappealing to competitors and audience alike. However, no normal person goes to watch a cricket match in the anticipation of seeing someone be killed, nor does any bowler deliberately set out to severely injure a batsman - intimidate, yes - but nothing more.

Nevertheless, I find it so hard to come to terms with the fact that we actually saw that young man die on the pitch. He was effectively dead when he fell face-forward, unconscious, onto the pitch. Medical intervention kept him breathing and technically alive on the ground and for 48 hours in hospital, but the injury was catastrophic - no chance of full recovery.

I'm an old woman who didn't know Phillip Hughes, nor have I ever played competitive cricket, yet like thousands - if not millions - I have been incredibly moved and saddened by this tragedy. It must be so much worse for his family, and his team-mates, especially those on the pitch that day who rushed in to help him. Of course, it would be impossible for them to play a five day test match starting this Thursday.

Today would have been his 26th birthday ..... dear God, his poor parents .....
:s_cry
I think it was just so shocking and we have had smatterings of terrible injuries, including paralyzations, in a few sports, but no deaths. To be honest I forgot that you run forward and throw the ball in cricket so at first I didn't understand how it could have happened at all. I feel so badly for the guy who threw it, too, he is very young and very talented also.

It is always worse when you have seen it on TV or you have the pictures of the aftermath... I have been in the crowd when that hush falls and it's a terrible helpless feeling. And especially shocking in a non-contact sport, but as you said beautifully, it's a fluke.
The best thing to happen to a criminal is to have Pat Brown profile the crime; you'll never get caught!

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Carana
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Re: Cricket is a dangerous game

Post by Carana » Sun Nov 30, 2014 9:37 am

Yet another time to pause and give loved ones that extra hug.

My thoughts are with those who knew and cared about him, including the poor chap who bowled the ball. I expect the trolls will be out shortly, if they aren't already.

My thoughts also go out to the families of all the innocent people killed in wars this year. They, too, were in the wrong place at the wrong time.
"A professor of mine used to say 'I have as a pet a coprophagic beetle, who eats only dung. His antennae quiver when he detects the presence of his food.'" - Edison, English-language Wikipedia Admin

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catkins
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Re: Cricket is a dangerous game

Post by catkins » Sun Nov 30, 2014 12:01 pm

Jeez another cricket related death.... :s_sad

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/cricke ... -ball.html
Madeleine McCann- Abducted May 2007 from Praia Da Luz, Algarve, Portugal.
DCI Redwood of Scotland Yard - stated that Madeleine could still be found - alive.
https://www.facebook.com/Official.Find. ... ign?_rdr=p

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Truthiness2
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Re: Cricket is a dangerous game

Post by Truthiness2 » Sun Nov 30, 2014 1:44 pm

:s_omg :s_omg :s_sad

That's even more bizarre - an umpire getting hit is so rare :s_omg

Poor man!
“‎"Consider the rights of others before your own feelings, and the feelings of others before your own rights.”
― John Wooden

Chinagirl
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Re: Cricket is a dangerous game

Post by Chinagirl » Wed Dec 03, 2014 4:58 am

Watching a live broadcast of the funeral. Beautiful service in a tiny NSW country town, attended by the cricket elite of this country, and the PM. Lovely tributes from his brother, sister and a cousin, and a very moving eulogy from Michael Clarke.

His poor, poor parents .....
:s_cry
[T]hose children were left alone and because of that fact one of them disappeared. (Fatima de Oliveira Esteves)

Wrong.
It's because someone took her.

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Jayelles
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Re: Cricket is a dangerous game

Post by Jayelles » Wed Dec 03, 2014 1:07 pm

Chinagirl wrote:Watching a live broadcast of the funeral. Beautiful service in a tiny NSW country town, attended by the cricket elite of this country, and the PM. Lovely tributes from his brother, sister and a cousin, and a very moving eulogy from Michael Clarke.

His poor, poor parents .....
:s_cry
It is very, very sad. Such a tragic accident. I feel so sorry for his family, but also for the bowler.

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catkins
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Re: Cricket is a dangerous game

Post by catkins » Wed Dec 03, 2014 3:25 pm

Yes.. all involved must be distraught.. :s_sad
Madeleine McCann- Abducted May 2007 from Praia Da Luz, Algarve, Portugal.
DCI Redwood of Scotland Yard - stated that Madeleine could still be found - alive.
https://www.facebook.com/Official.Find. ... ign?_rdr=p

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