The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

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jjbd
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The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by jjbd » Fri Apr 02, 2021 10:57 pm

I have been following this and have been surprised by the graphic videos that have been shown to support the statements.

So far the trial has been very fair and just a straightforward statement of what happened from various witnesses.

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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by honestbroker1 » Sat Apr 03, 2021 4:36 pm

Washington Post:
One after another, witnesses to the death of George Floyd took the stand this week in the trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer charged with his murder. The 19-year-old cashier who waited on Floyd that terrible day wondered whether he was at fault for reporting Floyd’s use of a fake $20 bill.

The teenage girl whose video of Floyd’s dying moments shocked the world spoke of being haunted by not doing more. The 61-year-old man who had begged Floyd to just cooperate with police broke down in tears as video played in court of Floyd calling for his mother as officers held him down. “I couldn’t help but feel helpless,” sobbed Charles McMillian.

The trial that opened Monday is in its early stages. But already it is painfully clear that Floyd was not the only victim that May day in Minneapolis. Those who were forced to stand by helplessly and watch as the 46-year-old Floyd died, gasping for breath, despite their desperate pleas to police, have been forever changed.

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“When I look at George Floyd, I look at my dad, I look at my brothers, I look at my cousins, my uncles, because they are all Black,” testified Darnella Frazier, who was 17 when she recorded the cellphone video of the May 25 events and posted it on Facebook, igniting a national reckoning over racism and police abuse. “I have a Black father. I have a Black brother. I have Black friends. And I look at that and I look at how that could have been one of them.” Describing the lingering anxiety she suffers from Floyd’s death, she said, “It’s been nights I stayed up apologizing and apologizing to George Floyd for not doing more and not physically interacting and not saving his life.”

Ms. Frazier was accompanying her 9-year-old cousin to the corner grocery store for snacks when they saw police confront Floyd. “I was sad and kind of mad,” the little girl testified. Nine years old and forced to watch someone die. Equally helpless and traumatized were the off-duty firefighter whose offer of medical assistance for the clearly distressed Floyd was spurned by police and the mixed martial arts fighter with a background in security work who warned Mr. Chauvin about the danger of the hold he had on Floyd.

The power that day was with the phalanx of police who responded to a call about a counterfeit $20 bill. As is too often the case when police interact with minority communities, their response was not to listen, not to help, but to respond to an imagined, nonexistent threat. Indeed, Mr. Chauvin’s attorney even suggested that it was the bystanders who were responsible for Floyd’s death. The crowd was hostile and posed a threat, Eric Nelson told the court, and that diverted police’s attention from Floyd.

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“Disbelief and guilt” is how store clerk Christopher Martin described what was going through his mind as he watched Mr. Chauvin kneel on Floyd’s neck heedless to cries he couldn’t breathe. He and other onlookers became victims as the police officer drove home their helplessness with his indifference and contempt. And Mr. Chauvin left many of them feeling guilty or ashamed, though Ms. Frazier had it exactly right when she testified, “It’s not what I should have done, it’s what he should have done.”

Read more:

The Post’s View: No jury should accept that Derek Chauvin was doing what he was trained to do

Eugene Robinson: Kneeling on George Floyd’s neck sent a message to everyone who saw it

Paul Butler: This new ruling could let the suspect in George Floyd’s killing go free

James Hohmann: Bystanders could not save Floyd’s life, but their testimony can shape his legacy

Eugene Robinson: The world saw George Floyd’s final minutes. Now it will see whether he gets justice.

Updated April 1, 2021
Read more on how to Reimagine Safety
Watching the Derek Chauvin murder trial is traumatizing America. More than ever, we’re reminded that every community deserves to be safe and healthy, but with police facing such a crisis of legitimacy, it can be hard to see a way forward. A project from The Washington Post Editorial Board inspires optimism with proven strategies that cities can embrace now and are not centered in law enforcement.

Read the full project here.

More from outside voices:

Andrea James: Women and girls must be at the center of reimagining safety

Richard Wallace: In Chicago, systemic racism runs deep. Our solutions must evolve.

Cedric L. Alexander: Which side are you on? That’s a question every police officer must answer.

Eugenia C. South: If Black lives really matter, we must invest in Black neighborhoods

Kassandra Frederique: To truly create safe communities, we must end the war on drugs

Thomas Abt: To stop the spike in urban violence, engage those most at risk

Elizabeth Hinton: We were warned about a divided America 50 years ago. We ignored the signs.

Chloe Cockburn: Money can’t buy criminal justice reform. But it can fuel a movement.

Robert Rooks, Lenore Anderson: No, crime survivors don’t want more prisons. They want a new safety movement.

Eric Cadora: Emergency management governance is our safety net of last resort. It’s not a good one.

Video:

Aqeela Sherrills: Police do not stop cycles of violence. Communities do.

Norma Loyd, Brandon Russ: Mental illness is not a crime. Police should not respond like it is.

Read the transcript of a live chat with editorial writer Emefa Addo Agawu on this project.

Read letters to the editor in response to this project.

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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by Alibongo » Mon Apr 05, 2021 9:41 am

I've been following the trial and keep thinking surely Chauvin will be found guilty but.....
If he walks free then I think we'll see rioting on a scale never seen before in history.
Parent-blaming is all-too-common these days, and usually the point is to make other parents feel better about their own parenting skills

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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by jjbd » Mon Apr 05, 2021 11:04 am

Alibongo wrote:
Mon Apr 05, 2021 9:41 am
I've been following the trial and keep thinking surely Chauvin will be found guilty but.....
If he walks free then I think we'll see rioting on a scale never seen before in history.
I agree he should be found guilty on the evidence so far - but what will he be convicted of:
What are the charges?

Derek Chauvin is facing charges of second-degree unintentional murder and second-degree manslaughter. An additional charge of third-degree murder was requested by prosecutors and added after an appeal.

A second-degree murder conviction is punishable by up to 40 years in prison. Third-degree murder would require a lower standard of proof than second-degree, and prosecutors hope the additional charge will improve their odds of securing a conviction against Mr Chauvin.

The second-degree murder charge requires prosecutors to prove Mr Chauvin caused Mr Floyd’s death while committing or trying to commit a crime - in this case, assaulting him by kneeling on his neck.

Prosecutors do not have to prove that Mr Chauvin was the sole cause of death, but that his conduct was a “substantial causal factor.”

To win a conviction on third-degree murder, prosecutors would have to show only that Mr Floyd’s death was caused by an act that was obviously dangerous, but not necessarily a crime. That carries a maximum sentence of 25 years in prison.

However, Mr Chauvin has no criminal history so would probably end up serving around 12 years regardless of whether he is convicted of second or third-degree murder.

Manslaughter, the least serious charge, requires prosecutors to prove that Mr Chauvin caused Mr Floyd's death through negligence, and carries a maximum sentence of 10 years.

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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by Carana » Mon Apr 05, 2021 5:13 pm

I've been following (in catch-up) as well, although only last week, plus some highlights of the jury selection process.

So far, both defence and prosecution appear to have handled witnesses sensitively (in contrast to the few other trials I've watched).

The only two questions appear to be:

a) whether he simply applied the measures allowed by his training; and

b) whether the officer's actions substantially contributed to his death.

A) Seems to show an excess of force.

B) The chap had medical problems and was on medication / drugs. The CCTV in the shop seemed to show someone possibly a bit slow / vacant, but also in a good mood (judging by his little dance). Would he have collapsed and died anyway outside? Seems unlikely. Could the officer have been oblivious to this? Seems unlikely, at least the audio of his voice seems that he assumed that Floyd was high on something.

I haven't seen the defence yet... so will have to wait.
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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by Carana » Mon Apr 05, 2021 5:26 pm

Alibongo wrote:
Mon Apr 05, 2021 9:41 am
I've been following the trial and keep thinking surely Chauvin will be found guilty but.....
If he walks free then I think we'll see rioting on a scale never seen before in history.
Agree, but the trial must be based on fact and law and mustn't be influenced by a fear of rioting, which, IMO, was probably a factor in the Cipriano fiasco.
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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by Carana » Mon Apr 05, 2021 6:35 pm

I don't see how Chauvin could possibly get off scot-free. Floyd was already handcuffed (with his hands behind his back, unless I'm mistaken on when exactly that happened). He was therefore not a threat in terms of violence to warrant such a reaction, most certainly not for that length of time.

I'm trying to think of a different hypothetical situation: I've seen clips of so-called "cannibals" gone nuts through "baths salts" or whatever the drug is called. But Floyd didn't appear to be displaying that kind of behaviour at all.
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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by jjbd » Mon Apr 05, 2021 7:52 pm

Compared to the Oscar Pistorius trial - which is the only other one I have watched live - this one is very good with no showboating to the audience/jury - it is just focusing on the facts.

When the defence starts it may be different.

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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by Carana » Mon Apr 05, 2021 8:00 pm

jjbd wrote:
Mon Apr 05, 2021 7:52 pm
Compared to the Oscar Pistorius trial - which is the only other one I have watched live - this one is very good with no showboating to the audience/jury - it is just focusing on the facts.

When the defence starts it may be different.
I was thinking of the Pistorius trial as well, but also of what I'd seen of the trial of the little US girl, Cayley Anthony.
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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by jjbd » Tue Apr 20, 2021 9:00 pm

Verdict is in and will be announced soon.

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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by honestbroker1 » Tue Apr 20, 2021 10:09 pm

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/worl ... 34766.html
If convicted, Mr Chauvin could face up to 40 years in prison for second-degree murder, up to 25 years for third-degree murder, and up to 10 years for second-degree manslaughter.

The charges will be considered separately by the jury so he could be convicted of none, some or all of them.
How on earth does that work?

Chauvin convicted on all charges:

https://uk.news.yahoo.com/derek-chauvin ... ll-brknews

Washington Post

April 20, 2021 at 10:47 p.m. GMT+1
Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has been convicted of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd on Memorial Day. He was immediately taken into custody after the jury announced its verdicts Tuesday afternoon, and he will be sentenced in the coming weeks.

The verdicts came less than a full day after closing arguments in the three-week trial concluded. On Monday, the prosecution and defense teams presented nearly six hours of closing arguments that focused on vastly different views about the circumstances that led to Floyd’s death in May outside Cup Foods in Minneapolis. (more) ...

Here’s what you need to know:
The nation had been bracing for a verdict and accompanying civil unrest that mirrored the across-the-country protests of last summer. Instead, people outside Cup Foods screamed with joy and tearfully embraced.
These are the jurors who decided Chauvin’s fate. Read Judge Peter A. Cahill’s instructions to the jurors.
A Washington Post series, “George Floyd’s America,” examined the role systemic racism played throughout Floyd’s 46-year life.
What video and other records show about Floyd’s final minutes. (more)

The Floyd family’s lawyers heralded Tuesday’s verdict as “painfully earned justice” that would reverberate far and wide.

“Painfully earned justice has arrived for George Floyd’s family and the community here in Minneapolis, but today’s verdict goes far beyond this city and has significant implications for the country and even the world,” attorney Ben Crump said in a statement. “Justice for Black America is justice for all of America. This case is a turning point in American history for accountability of law enforcement and sends a clear message we hope is heard clearly in every city and every state.”

Crump, who represents the Floyd family, thanked Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison and the rest of the prosecution for “their fierce dedication to justice for George.”

He also brought up the three other former officers who were charged for their actions in May and are awaiting trial. “We have not forgotten” that they must be held accountable, as well, Crump said.

Another Floyd family lawyer, L. Chris Stewart, said Tuesday’s verdict shored up faith in the American justice system.

“All that people crave is accountability when an officer kills a Black American. For far too long, that had never happened,” he said. “Now George Floyd’s soul can finally rest in peace. Justice has been served.”

The Floyd family settled with the city of Minneapolis in March for $27 million over Floyd’s killing.

10:41 p.m.
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Minneapolis mayor, Minnesota governor say guilty verdict is important step forward
By Timothy Bella
Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey and Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said Tuesday that the guilty verdict in Chauvin’s trial was a necessary, “important step forward” in the push for racial justice but that the city and state still have a long road ahead.

“This murder verdict won’t change the fact that George Floyd’s family has been rendered incomplete. It won’t undo the damage to community, restore the potential and promise of his life, or give a child her father back,” Frey (D) said in a news release. “But the decision marks an important step in our pursuit of racial justice in Minneapolis — one important step on a much longer journey.”

Walz (D) echoed those sentiments in a separate news release, saying that “accountability in the courtroom is only the first step.”

“Too many Black people have lost — and continue to lose — their lives at the hands of law enforcement in our state,” the governor said. “Our communities of color cannot go on like this. Our police officers cannot go on like this. Our state simply cannot go on like this. And the only way it will change is through systemic reform.”

Outside the Cup Foods, there was a brief lull as roughly 100 people gathered, watching live streams and listening to the radio as they awaited the verdict.

“Guilty on first charge!” a voice called out, prompting cheers from the crowd. The cheering intensified as each charge came back with a guilty verdict, as people screamed with joy and tearfully embraced.

Leon Lyons, 60, was one of the first protesters at 38th and Chicago the day after Floyd’s death. Ten months later, he stood on a bench near the memorial and yelled, “We shook up the world,” as the verdict reached the crowd of hundreds who had gathered to listen.

“I just went crazy. I didn’t believe it," he said. “I still don’t believe it.”

Shawn Mayes, a fourth-generation Black Minnesotan, closed her eyes as if to pray and raised both hands.

“Oh, my Lord,” she said in a trembling voice. “I feel like I can breathe.”

“This proves the city of Minneapolis, the people of Hennepin County, see Black people as human beings that have the right to live.”

Mayes, 48, said the jury saw that Floyd was murdered. “They understood that,” she said.

“It changes everything,” she said. “Now we go forward and make change. We go to our senators, our congresspeople, and we make change.”

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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by honestbroker1 » Tue Apr 20, 2021 11:02 pm

(continued from above):
Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all counts of murder and manslaughter on Tuesday afternoon in the death of George Floyd last year.

The former Minneapolis police officer was found guilty of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

The jury’s announcement Tuesday ended hours of deliberations that took place as the nation braced for a verdict in the case.

Chauvin, who knelt on Floyd for more than nine minutes on May 25, is now just the second police officer in Minnesota to ever be convicted of murder for an on-duty incident in the state.

When the verdict was announced by the Judge Peter A. Cahill, Chauvin looked on blankly from his chair.

Each murder charge for a person with no criminal history carries a presumptive prison sentence of 12.5 years, according to Minnesota sentencing guidelines. The manslaughter charge for someone without a criminal record carries a presumptive prison sentence of four years.
“Hey hey, Ho Ho, Derek Chauvin has got to go,” chanted a crowd outside the Hennepin County, Minn., courthouse.

Black Lives Matter flags were waving in the air and the anxiety and hype built as the jury verdict approached. Amber Young, 50, took off from work in case a verdict would be announced and arrived here at noon.

“I felt it was important,” she said. “I’m so nervous.”

She works at the Salvation Army location where Floyd used to work. She said she worries that her 23-year-old Black son could become another “Facebook live video or hashtag” on police brutality.

A helicopter circled overhead as Black Lives Matter flags waved in the air.

10:08 p.m.
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Officials in Minneapolis, cities across the country, prepare for a night of protests
By Reis Thebault
From the streets leading to the courthouse where Derek Chauvin has stood trial, to cities across the country, buildings have been fortified with plywood and police have been put on high alert as state and local leaders prepare for an evening of protests following the jury’s decision.

In the Twin Cities, thousands of National Guard troops have been deployed. Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz (D) said Monday that there were not yet plans for a statewide or regional curfew order, but that he will monitor the situation following the verdict. Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey (D) warned that rioting or looting “will not be tolerated.”

“We cannot have people that seek to use peaceful protesters as cover to cause destruction in our city,” he said.

In Oakland, Calif., where fierce protests have unfolded in the past, police chief LaRonne Armstrong toured the city’s shuttered downtown and pleaded that protesters demonstrate peacefully, whether Chauvin is found guilty or innocent.

“Whatever the outcome might be, destroying our city is not going to change anything,” he said.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) said leaders are in “constant, literally daily conversations” about how to respond to possible protests. Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot (D) requested the National Guard be put on standby and Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker (D) complied.

“It’s critical that those who wish to peacefully protest against the systemic racism and injustice in our communities continue to be able to do so,” Pritzker said.

And in the nation’s capital, D.C. police are “fully activated.”

9:51 p.m.
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Chauvin arrives at the courthouse ahead of verdict
By Timothy Bella
Derek Chauvin arrived at the courthouse Tuesday afternoon ahead of the jury announcing its verdict in his murder trial.

The jury ended its deliberations just hours after it began late Monday.

Chauvin faces three charges in the killing of Floyd — second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

Crowds have already started to gather outside the courthouse, anxiously awaiting the verdict.

The verdict is expected sometime around 5 p.m. Eastern time.

9:16 p.m.
Link copied
Who are the 12 jurors who decided Derek Chauvin’s fate?
By Mark Berman and Holly Bailey
Two weeks of jury selection in former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin’s murder trial whittled a pool of more than 300 potential jurors down to 12, with three alternates at the beginning. There is one Black woman, two multiracial women, three White men, three Black men and six White women. Seven are under 40 years old.

The jurors were charged with deciding one of the highest-profile cases in recent memory, which took place in a downtown courtroom a few miles from where Floyd was filmed facedown on a Minneapolis street. Their decision will reverberate across the country, setting off renewed debates about race, policing and accountability.

The closing arguments are finished and the jury has concluded its deliberations. The country has little to do but wait and try not to gnaw itself to bits.

The prosecution in the Derek Chauvin trial laid out its case with dozens of bystander and expert witnesses called over the course of a week. But the essence of it came down to this: “Believe your eyes.” The 9 minute and 29 second bystander video that showed Chauvin with his knee atop George Floyd’s neck, as the Black man lay handcuffed and facedown on the pavement crying out for oxygen, is exactly what it appears to be: an unlawful use of force and the primary cause of Floyd’s death.

The defense’s rebuttal might be summed up as: Don’t believe your eyes. Chauvin’s actions were objectively reasonable. And besides, the knee on the neck had nothing to do with Floyd’s death.

(END).

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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by Alibongo » Wed Apr 21, 2021 8:50 am

Do you think Chauvin expected a guilty verdict or he's disassociated himself from the proceedings. There was literally no reaction from him at all at the guilty verdict I thought.
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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by jjbd » Wed Apr 21, 2021 9:58 am

Alibongo wrote:
Wed Apr 21, 2021 8:50 am
Do you think Chauvin expected a guilty verdict or he's disassociated himself from the proceedings. There was literally no reaction from him at all at the guilty verdict I thought.
Like everyone else he saw and heard the evidence against him. There was no doubt in my mind and probably his as well.

He will possibly spend his whole sentence in isolation for his own safety.

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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by Carana » Thu Apr 22, 2021 10:53 am

Going from memory of a legal expert's explanation of sentencing (NBC?):

- Although found guilty of all charges, the sentences wouldn't be served consecutively as they all related to the same incident. Therefore only the most serious one needs to be taken into account. Theoretically, up to 40 years.

- Sentencing guidelines take various factors into account (he had no prior convictions... although he had 18 formal complaints against him for other matters only 2 ended up with disciplinary measures) and so could end up with 12.5 year sentence, of which he'd typically have to serve 2/3.

- The prosecution may present aggravating factors (cruelty and the presence of kids), which, if accepted by the judge, could increase the sentence.

- The defense could appeal on various grounds: not moving to a different jurisdiction - although I fail to see what that would have changed; that Maxine Water's comment could have scared the jurors - assuming any of them disrespected the rules of not watching the news, which would have to be proven, presumably... and something else that I can't recall for the mo.
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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by Carana » Thu Apr 22, 2021 11:06 am

jjbd wrote:
Wed Apr 21, 2021 9:58 am
Alibongo wrote:
Wed Apr 21, 2021 8:50 am
Do you think Chauvin expected a guilty verdict or he's disassociated himself from the proceedings. There was literally no reaction from him at all at the guilty verdict I thought.
Like everyone else he saw and heard the evidence against him. There was no doubt in my mind and probably his as well.

He will possibly spend his whole sentence in isolation for his own safety.
In some of the other cases hitting the headlines, I can imagine in some instances the cop in question made a split-second decision that turned out to be excessive. Misjudging a situation can happen, but that's hardly the case in this one.

Yes, JJ, I expect he'll have to serve a large part of his sentence in isolation as well.
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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by jjbd » Thu Apr 22, 2021 11:26 am

Carana wrote:
Thu Apr 22, 2021 11:06 am
jjbd wrote:
Wed Apr 21, 2021 9:58 am
Alibongo wrote:
Wed Apr 21, 2021 8:50 am
Do you think Chauvin expected a guilty verdict or he's disassociated himself from the proceedings. There was literally no reaction from him at all at the guilty verdict I thought.
Like everyone else he saw and heard the evidence against him. There was no doubt in my mind and probably his as well.

He will possibly spend his whole sentence in isolation for his own safety.
In some of the other cases hitting the headlines, I can imagine in some instances the cop in question made a split-second decision that turned out to be excessive. Misjudging a situation can happen, but that's hardly the case in this one.

Yes, JJ, I expect he'll have to serve a large part of his sentence in isolation as well.
I believe he is currently under suicide watch.

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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by Carana » Thu Apr 22, 2021 11:27 am

As I expect most people in isolation are.

Found a link to sentencing guidelines.

https://mn.gov/msgc-stat/documents/Guid ... entary.pdf
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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by catkins » Thu Apr 22, 2021 4:28 pm

Alibongo wrote:
Wed Apr 21, 2021 8:50 am
Do you think Chauvin expected a guilty verdict or he's disassociated himself from the proceedings. There was literally no reaction from him at all at the guilty verdict I thought.
I noticed that as well. I think he knew ithe verdict was a foregone conclusion.
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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by catkins » Thu Apr 22, 2021 4:30 pm

Caught a bit on Court Tv today....it’s now going to be the turn of the other three Officers present. I didn’t realise that at least two of them were only a few days into the job
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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by Carana » Thu Apr 22, 2021 6:06 pm

catkins wrote:
Thu Apr 22, 2021 4:30 pm
Caught a bit on Court Tv today....it’s now going to be the turn of the other three Officers present. I didn’t realise that at least two of them were only a few days into the job
Yes, which may be a mitigating factor for them.

Another one, Thao, also has a history of complaints against him - beating up a guy (who was simply walking home with his pregnant girlfriend, and apparently hadn't done anything wrong).

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/derek-chau ... ers-trial/

Can't find the original article I'd read, this one doesn't give all the details.

Thao’s work history includes six unspecified police conduct complaints. Five were closed without discipline, but one was open at the time of his firing. Thao’s police training records were not included in the personnel records released.

Thao and another officer were the subjects of a 2017 police brutality lawsuit. Lamar Ferguson alleged that in 2014 the two officers told him they were serving a warrant for his arrest, then beat him, breaking his teeth, while he was handcuffed. The city of Minneapolis paid $25,000 to settle the civil rights case.
https://www.startribune.com/personnel-r ... 571019902/


NB: Think it was this one:
https://edition.cnn.com/us/live-news/ge ... fbac2918f5
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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by Carana » Thu Apr 22, 2021 7:11 pm

A research study into police killings according to race, gender, age.

If you happen to be a youngish Black guy in the US, you have 1/1000 chances of being killed by a cop, which is far greater than other categories.
https://www.pnas.org/content/116/34/16793
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catkins
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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by catkins » Fri Apr 23, 2021 3:53 pm

Carana wrote:
Thu Apr 22, 2021 7:11 pm
A research study into police killings according to race, gender, age.

If you happen to be a youngish Black guy in the US, you have 1/1000 chances of being killed by a cop, which is far greater than other categories.
https://www.pnas.org/content/116/34/16793
Their policing training and Laws certainly seems to require a major overhaul.

Saying that....guns are far too prominent and available in the US....folk carry guns to protect themselves and so gun ownership mushrooms imo.
Madeleine McCann- Abducted May 2007 from Praia Da Luz, Algarve, Portugal.
DCI Redwood of Scotland Yard - stated that Madeleine could still be found - alive.
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Carana
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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by Carana » Fri Apr 30, 2021 11:40 am

The NRA (and other pro-gun lobbies) is extremely powerful in the US.

I fairly recently had an interesting conversation with a US lady, no doubt following one of the numerous mass shootings.

She told me that she'd never dream of taking a long car trip through rural areas without a rifle for self-protection. I can sort of understand that, think: the film "Duel".

However, I've yet to have a sensible discussion with anyone as to why people feel the need (?) to have often a dozen firearms, including semi-automatics, e.g. AK-15s (Kalashnikovs, in effect).

The NRA's argument as to how to stop massacres is for everyone to have the same fire power at hand. Somehow that is supposed to reduce deaths by being better armed to retaliate at any moment. As one does, while going to the cinema with the kids.

I found this clip chilling from Dana Loesch from 2018:
https://www.standard.co.uk/news/world/n ... 82386.html

IMO, and I've had suspicions for a while, as some here may remember, that Russia, the conservative / alt-right and disaster capitalists are in cahoots in areas of mutual interest.

And that cosy relationship expanded to Europe.
"A professor of mine used to say 'I have as a pet a coprophagic beetle, who eats only dung. His antennae quiver when he detects the presence of his food.'" - Edison, English-language Wikipedia Admin

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honestbroker1
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Re: The Death Of George Floyd Murder Trial.

Post by honestbroker1 » Fri Jun 25, 2021 9:23 pm

Derek Chauvin sentenced to 22 years

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/world-u ... a-57615066

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